General FAQ’s

1. Who is the consignee and who is the consignor or shipper?
2. Should we let our supplier handle the international freight arrangements?
3. How many cubic meters of cargo can I put in a 20’ container 40’ container and 40’ High Cube container?
4. How many tonnes can I put in a container?
5. What is the volumetric charge for sea-freight shipments?
6. What is the volumetric charge for air-freight shipments?
7. What is the maximum permitted size for an air-freight shipment?
8. Why do I need a packing declaration for my sea-reight shipments and what details does it need to show?
9. What documents do I need to provide for customs clearance when importing goods?



Personal Effects FAQ’s

1. How do World Cargo Network rates compare with excess baggage?
2. How do we find our baggage at destination?
3. Is delivery to the door available?
4. Will I be contacted at destination?
5. Are there charges payable at the destination?
6. What about duties, GST, VAT and sales tax?
7. How do I pack my things?
8. What should I not pack?
9. Is it cheaper by air than by sea?



1. Who is the consignee and who is the consignor or shipper?
The consignor (or shipper) is the person who is the originator of the shipment. A consignee is the person who is the receiver or buyer of the shipment.

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2. Should we let out supplier handle the international freight arrangements?
The person that arranges the international freight is in control of the routing and costs. If your cargo is time critical or high value you may want to be in charge of these arrangements. We will act on your behalf to ensure your cargo is moved on a service that will meet your delivery deadlines.

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3. How many cubic meters of cargo can I put in a 20’ container 40’ container and 40’ High Cube container?
A 20’ General Purpose (20’GP) container has a volume of 33 cubic metres and will usually hold approx. 27-28 cubic metres of cargo – depending on the packing. A 40’ General Purpose (40’GP) container has a volume of 67 cubic metres and will hold 55-60 cubic metres of cargo - depending on the packing. A 40’ High Cube (40’HC) container has a volume of 76 cubic metres and will hold about 65-70 cubic metres of cargo – depending on the packing.

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4. How many tonnes can I put in a container?
Each container has a maximum cargo weight (please refer to fact sheet on Container Specifications). Generally the maximum weight limit on roads is 28.5 tonnes gross (including weight of container, trailer and goods) and a maximum weight limit of 23 tonnes for side-loader deliveries.

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5. What is the volumetric charge for sea-freight shipments?
Sea-freight shipments of less than a container load (LCL) are charged on a “one to one” basis. This means that every one tonne (1,000kgs) equals 1 cubic metre (cbm). For example, for a shipment which is 2.65cbm and 3 tonne volumetric measurement is 3 tonne (3 tonne is greater than 2.65cbm).

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6. What is the volumetric charge for air-freight shipments?
IATA regulations state that 1kg will be charged for 6,000 cubic Centimetres of volume. This is the equivalent of 167 Kilos per cubic metre. For example a shipment that weighs 285kgs and is 2 cubic metres the volumetric measurement would be 334kgs (2 cubic metres x 167=334kgs which is greater than 285kgs).

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7. What is the maximum permitted size for an air-freight shipment?
This will be determined by the aircraft. Most international air cargo is moved on passenger aircraft. Cargo should be less than 3 metres in length, 2 metres in width and 1.6 metres high.

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8. Why do I need a packing declaration for my sea-freight shipments and what details does it need to show?
Australia needs help to protect its important agricultural industries and unique natural environment from exotic pests and diseases. By providing a packing declaration you will ensure the fastest clearance of cargo and help Australia keep out exotic pests and diseases. A packing declaration is required by the Australian Quarantine Inspection Service (AQIS) for all sea-freight shipments. The packing declaration should be completed by the packer of the goods, on their letterhead and must show a numerical link to the shipment (eg. Bill of Lading Number, Container Number, Commercial Invoice Number). This declaration will provide details of container cleanliness and whether straw and timber have been used as packing material. If you don’t provide this information the container will have to be opened and inspected at a Quarantine approved premises. You can apply for an annual packing declaration if you import on a regular basis.

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9. What documents do I need to provide for customs clearance when importing goods?
You need to ensure you have the following documents:

* Bill of Lading (seafreight) or Airway bill (airfreight)

*A commercial invoice which is in English and includes a description of each type of item, the country of origin, invoice amount and currency.

*A packing declaration for sea freight cargo

You may also require an overseas fumigation certificate from an approved fumigation company, a phytosanitary certificate, health certificate, a permit issued by a regional health authority, and import permit, a certificate of origin.

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1. HOW DO WORLD CARGO NETWORK RATES COMPARE WITH EXCESS BAGGAGE?
World Cargo Network are up to 60 per cent less than excess baggage. Your baggage travels on the first available flight direct to airport of destination and you deal direct with the International airline at the destination.

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2. HOW DO WE FIND OUR BAGGAGE AT DESTINATION?
Once your baggage is in care of World Cargo Network we advise you the Airline your baggage is travelling on, the airwaybill number - an eleven digit number - ( tracking Number), and the estimated arrival date, you could also keep track of your shipment by visiting http://www.track-trace.com/aircargo and entering your 11 digit tracking number. To ensure your freight has arrived.

Once World Cargo Network has picked up your baggage please ensure that you ring our office before you leave Australia as it is very hard to find your baggage if you do not know the above details.

Australian security regulations do not allow World Cargo Network to give these details before your baggage is in our care.

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3. IS DELIVERY TO THE DOOR AVAILABLE?
YES - Delivery to the door is available to some destinations but is expensive. Usually you have to go to the airport so why pay more if you are able to clear customs yourself. Additional charges apply for delivery to the door so check with World Cargo Network.

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4. WILL I BE CONTACTED AT DESTINATION?
YES - Once your baggage has arrived at its destination. You are only allowed so many hours free storage on arrival. See our web site -- www.worldcargonetwork.com.au/documentation/airportstorage. To avoid storage charges you must go to the airport immediately.

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5. ARE THERE CHARGES PAYABLE AT THE DESTINATION?
There are sometimes airline terminal fees, customs fees and/or Quarantine fees payable at some destinations. This is at the discretion of each country and/or International Airline. World Cargo Network consign all baggage direct to airport of destination to avoid agents fees. If you are asked to pay any fees ask what you are paying for and always ask for an official receipt.

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6. WHAT ABOUT DUTIES, GST, VAT AND SALES TAX
Duties, sales tax, G.S.T., V.A.T. vary from country to country and usually if you have owned your personal effects for more than 12 months no taxes are payable. You may be asked for receipts to prove ownership and date of purchase.

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7. HOW DO I PACK MY THINGS?
Your baggage is going across the world, so pack accordingly. Use suitcases or good quality strong boxes or bags. Remember these are your valuable personal effects that in most cases cannot be replaced no matter how much Insurance. USE COMMON SENSE DO NOT OVERLOAD BOXES OR BAGS. You pay by weight and not by the number of boxes you send.

Use good quality packing tape and packing material. Pack delicate things in the centre and surround with clothes or newspapers.

The last word on packing is do not use the red and white stripy bags - they cost $1.00/$2.00 each and are trouble as they split open and rip easily.

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8. WHAT SHOULD I NOT PACK?
You will be surprised that some common items are not allowed on an aircraft.
Dangerous goods are totally unacceptable, unless a Dangerous Goods certificate has been organised and is accompanying your freight, this can be really costly & time consuming.
You will be signing a statutory declaration on the World Cargo Network Shippers letter of Instruction which places the responsibility on you the shipper, for dangerous goods.
Carrying dangerous goods aboard an aircraft is an offence and may be subject to severe penalty.

Failure to declare Dangerous goods in your shipment may be subject to fines of $46,000.00 and or seven years in prison.

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9. IS IT CHEAPER BY AIR THAN BY SEA?
Experience has found when sending from Australia that up to 100 kilograms is cheaper by air than sea.
Sea cargo is cheaper - port to port- but the handling charges, port charges and local charges at destination are usually very expensive.
When you weigh up all the extra charges by sea cargo, air is usually cheaper.

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